Walking Around Wivey

We are nearly at the end of this short trip to Somerset and will be heading back home tomorrow.  I already have plans to pop back to this area in a few weeks to stay at Minehead so we decide walk relatively close to Wellington today.  Our starting point is the small town of Wiveliscombe, or “Wivey” as it is referred to locally.

We start our walk from the public car park in North Street and wander into the town passing the Old Court House and heading down the High Street to cross the road into South Street. This leads us through Hartswell on the outskirts of the town then we head uphill on a road to take the first turning on the right into Pyncombe Lane. This country lane continues uphill and despite the misty weather we get to appreciate some fine views.

The lane takes us past driveways to North Down Farm and Pyncombe Farm. Then at a fork in the road we take the left route into Bicking’s Close Lane and then very soon after turn right off the tarmac lane onto a track.  Here I take a brief diversion to pop up to the trig point in pasture on the left.

Having bagged my 125th Ordnance survey trig point I return to Lynnie and the dogs and we continue along the track, which soon goes steadily downhill.

On reaching a tarmac lane we turn right and follow it to the crossroads at Hellings Cross, we turn right onto the road signposted Waterrow and Venn Cross.  At a junction we turn right along a lane signposted to Waterrow and Chipstable.  This road leads past Hurstone Farm and then onto the junction with B3227 where we turn left towards the Rock Inn.

After crossing the River Tone we turn right to follow the lane, passing through Waterrow with the River Tone to our right, we ignore two junctions with roads leading off to the left. The low cloud means that we are not getting the best of the views of the valley.

We continue along this lane until we reach Marsh’s Farm, we pass the farm entrance and then within a few hundred yards take a track on the left which leads besides the farm buildings.

The track leads us uphill, we ignore a footpath leading along Pitt Lane, instead we follow the West Deane Way markers to follow the footpath along an old cart track running through trees above the River Tone.

The path leads us to a footbridge over the River close to a ford. After crossing the river we turn left and cross the road and continue along a track besides the River.

The clear track stays close to the river as it passes through Maundown Plantation we are still on the West Deane Way and the route leads us to Washbattle Bridge.

We do not cross the bridge but continue straight on up hill for a few hundreds yards before taking a footpath on the right which takes the West Deane Way up through Maundown Plantation to reach fields of pasture on Maudown Hill.

We go through a gate and cross one field , the path then turns to the left to follow the hedge line to reach a gate to an old track.  We go through the gate and follow this wonderful old track.

Eventually the track leads us to a junction with Jews Lane, we turn right and follow the stunning Jews Lane back towards Wiveliscombe. At a fork in the track we leave the West Deane Way by heading right to follow the Wivey Way back into the town.

On reaching the car park where we started we have covered close to eight and a half miles.  It has been interesting to explore this area of the Brendon Hills and although quite a few sections of the walk were on tarmac lanes we did not encounter a single car.  Wiveliscombe is the home to two excellent breweries, Exmoor Ales and Cotleigh Brewery, both of which brew beer to my taste.  So it is tempting to pop into one of the many pubs in the town for a sharpner, however we need to get back to Wellington to pack up the caravan for an early start back home tomorrow.

To view this 8.5 mile walk on OS Maps Click Here

To follow our walk you will need Ordnance Survey Outdoor Explorer 128 – Taunton & Blackdown Hills

7th January 2019

© Two Dogs and an Awning (2019)

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